Dialogues

(edited) Speaking/Listening Practice

Some pronunciation/listening tips

Notice step 3. You can also do that for recapitulation, or when you have not interacted much because you cannot come up with comments or questions to what your classmate said.

Make sure you make questions, follow-up questions, or “need-more-info” questions. Show you care about what the person is saying, that you are following.

This one’s easy, but THINK as you listen.

Practice language you need for interactions. Remember you’ve also got my podcast (the Useful Language segment).

This one’s fun! But avoid “screwed” and “fucked” in exams, even if it’s an informal interaction. Well, it’s just an idea!

Notice transitions & signal words, how they organize their text, how they introduce questions to allow us to follow, not only the vocabulary on travel, I mean!

Openings, then beginning a point and ending it. Always clear: but you need to see the structure in your outline, of course, that’s what the outline is for. Extras: transitions for moving on: connecting previous to subsequent.

Enjoy your weekend, listening and repeating and imagining scenarios for interactions, and speaking about topics. Practice introducing topics/points “About my second point, …” (it’s like how we start paragraphs)

Advertisements

A Proposal

Perhaps next Monday we can play exams in this way:

to tackle the problem mentioned today by Soluna, about interactions being unbalancing, really, when one role is that of having to explain things and the other of making questions.

My idea is: why don’t some of you prepare a situation of that kind and on Monday you give me the role of the one that needs to ask, or answer, when the other needs to give explanations? I’d like to show you how we can try and balance the amount of language each can offer.

Perhaps Soluna could play today’s role and I could take Lorena’s, or any of you could make a different proposal. Whatever!